Middle East Research and Information Project: Critical Coverage of the Middle East Since 1971

The school in Dahiyat Amir Hasan in East Amman is only half-finished, but even through the rubble and the clouds of concrete dust it is clear that the education there will be very different than in Jordan’s other government-run schools. The classrooms are spacious and positioned around multi-purpose areas that can be used for team teaching or supervised recreation. Downstairs there are science labs equipped with vapor hoods, sinks and Bunsen burners, and set up for students to conduct experiments in groups. There is a gym, an art studio and a music chamber -- none of which facilities are standard in Jordanian public schools. The corresponding subjects, in fact, are often left out of the curriculum.

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How to cite this article:

Nicholas Seeley "The Politics of Aid to Iraqi Refugees in Jordan," Middle East Report 256 (Fall 2010).
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