Kurdistan, One and Many

 

Summer 2020

Kurdish politics in all its valences are a microcosm of Middle East politics. The ever-contested socio-political space of Kurdistan reveals the promises and limits of both desiring and undoing the modern nation-state framework. This issue explores the concrete social struggles that actualize Kurdistan in relation to a rich history, intersectional demands and the shifting political terrain of the twenty-first century. It captures a multiplicity of politics from the perspectives of agents as they deal with various domestic constituents, nation-states, political projects and geopolitics. Kurdish politics exhibit a plethora of engagements providing a glimpse into possible alternative ways of imagining nationhood, popular sovereignty and transnational politics. The politics of Kurdistan is not singular, nor is it only about the struggles of Kurds.

Issue Editors: Ayҫa Alemdaroğlu, Elif Babül, Arang Keshavarzian, Nabil Al-Tikriti

CURRENT ANALYSIS

Water in the Middle East: A Primer

Water in the Middle East: A Primer

Jessica Barnes 09.15.2020

Water is a prominent topic in discussions about the Middle East. Yet media coverage, policy reports and scholarly works often fall into simplistic accounts of scarcity, imminent crisis and potential water wars. “Water in the Middle East,” a primer in PDF format by Jessica Barnes, offers a valuable introduction to the topic that challenges these dominant narratives.

Going to War with the Coronavirus and Maintaining the State of Resistance in Iran

Going to War with the Coronavirus and Maintaining the State of Resistance in Iran

The Iranian government is fighting against the coronavirus pandemic not only with travel restrictions and social distancing rules, but also with ideological tools that promote unity and resistance. Through the production of posters and other media, Iran is creating connections between earlier battles, such as the Iran-Iraq war, and the current health crisis. Kevin Schwartz and Olmo Gölz trace the lineage of the iconography used in these images and the ideological efforts behind them.

The Armenian Genocide in Kurdish Collective Memory

The Armenian Genocide in Kurdish Collective Memory

Adnan Çelik 08.4.2020

Kurdish acknowledgement of participation in the Armenian genocide of 1915 along with Kurdish municipal efforts to atone have grown tremendously in the past 20 years. Adnan Çelik draws on his fieldwork and personal experience to explain how Kurdish memory work—drawing on knowledge transmitted for more than a century through Kurdish language, communal memories and traces left in the landscape—is making space for all oppressed groups in Turkey to seek justice. Forthcoming in MER 295, “Kurdistan, One and Many.”

Big Village Interactive Documentary Tells Small Stories of a Rebel Kurdish Village

Big Village Interactive Documentary Tells Small Stories of a Rebel Kurdish Village

Peyman Jafari 08.4.2020

After the 1979 Iranian revolution, Iranian Kurds fighting for autonomy moved to the village Gewredê in Iraq. The online, interactive documentary Big Village reconstructs life in Gewredê in the mid-1980s, as remembered by the residents. The viewer can click on interviews, pictures, videos and texts, which makes Big Village an excellent teaching tool for studying Kurdish history and the Iranian revolution. Forthcoming in MER 295, “Kurdistan, One and Many.”

Arabs Across Syria Join the Kurdish-Led Syrian Democratic Forces

Arabs Across Syria Join the Kurdish-Led Syrian Democratic Forces

The Autonomous Administration of North and East Syria and the Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF) defending it were established by Kurdish political and military forces. But the SDF also attracts recruits from all over Syria. Why do Arabs from areas both inside and outside SDF control join this military force? Drawing on her field research, Amy Austin Holmes presents the stories of six Arab men and women that shed light on their motivations and the circumstances surrounding their choices. Forthcoming in MER issue 295 “Kurdistan, One and Many.”

Why Civil Society is Libya’s Best Defense Against the COVID-19 Pandemic

Why Civil Society is Libya’s Best Defense Against the COVID-19 Pandemic

Nada Elfeituri 07.23.2020

With its national government in fragments and fighting ongoing, Libya was in an extremely vulnerable position when the COVID-19 pandemic arrived in March. Four months later, however, infection rates have been kept relatively low. Nada Elfeituri explores the crucial role of post-Qaddafi civil society in confronting the coronavirus and the still precarious position of the Libyan people.

FEATURED PRIMER

One of MERIP’s signature issues over the years has been the question of Palestine and the Arab-Israeli conflict—partly because of its intrinsic interest but largely because so much myth and cant clouds the mainstream media coverage of this subject that independent analysis is particularly necessary. This primer by Joel Beinin and Lisa Hajjar is a good place to start in understanding what is at stake as events unfold.
(Photo of Israeli separation barrier by Alfonso Moral.)

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