Iran's Reform Dilemma

Within and Against the State

by Ali Mudara | published September 12, 2000

Politics, Not Policy

Behind US Calls for War Crimes Tribunals for Iraq

by Sarah Graham-Brown | published August 25, 2000

In a public break with the US, British Foreign Secretary Robin Cook today submitted a draft parliamentary bill supporting the rapid establishment of an International Criminal Court (ICC) in which to try major war criminals and violators of human rights. The British move to secure the ICC's ratification in Parliament contrasts sharply with the Clinton administration's recalcitrance on the ICC. The US continues to insist on protecting its own nationals from prosecution by the ICC--even at the cost of watering down the court's mandate.

Egypt Harasses Human Rights Activists

by Nicola Pratt | published August 17, 2000

Family and friends of Saad Eddin Ibrahim, chair of Egypt's Ibn Khaldoun Center for Developmental Studies, breathed a huge sigh of relief on August 10, when Ibrahim was finally released on bail by prosecution authorities. The arrest at gunpoint of this internationally renowned pro-democracy activist and academic in his home on June 30 deeply shocked all of Egypt's civil society activists. Yet, in the context of continued government harassment of non-governmental organizations, Ibrahim's release hardly represents an unqualified victory.

Camp David II

by Joel Beinin | published July 26, 2000

The failure of the Palestinian-Israeli-American summit at Camp David did not surprise most Palestinians or those who understand Palestinian opinion on the issues. Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak's well-publicized "red lines" going into the negotiations delineated a position very far from the minimum that the Palestinian national consensus could accept as a resolution of the Palestinian-Israeli conflict.

Israel's Cabinet Crisis and the Political Economy of Peace

by Joel Beinin | published June 19, 2000

Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak postponed this week's cabinet meeting from Sunday to Tuesday in an effort to resolve the crisis prompted by the Shas Party's announcement that it is leaving his government. Shas (Sephardi Torah Guardians), with 17 seats in the Knesset, is Israel's third largest party and the second largest in the current government after Barak's Labor/One Israel. It is an ultra-orthodox religious party whose supporters are mainly poor and working class Jews whose families came to Israel from Middle Eastern countries (Mizrahim).

"They Dignified Our University"

Anti-Sanctions Protesters Rock Berkeley's Commencement

by Nadine Naber , Fadia Rafeedie | published May 24, 2000

Destroying Houses and Lives

An Interview with Salim Shawamreh and Jeff Halper

by Ghassan Bishara | published April 5, 2000

Existing Political Vessels Cannot Contain the Reform Movement

A Conversation with Sai'id Hajjarian

by Kaveh Ehsani | published March 13, 2000

The following is the text of an interview with Sai'id Hajjarian that first appeared in Middle East Report 212 (Fall 1999). Hajjarian, a newspaper editor and key adviser to President Mohammad Khatami, was shot and severely disabled by political foes in March 2000.

Greater Insecurity for Refugees in Lebanon

by Rosemary Sayigh | published March 1, 2000

Expectations of a regional settlement have exacerbated the always bad security situation of Palestinian refugees in Lebanon. Possible unilateral Israeli withdrawal from South Lebanon has intensified regional competition to control the "Palestinian card," particularly in the South where more than half the refugee population lives.

News Not "Fit to Print"

Fighting the Lebanon War: Hizballah and the Press

by Jennifer Loewenstein | published February 23, 2000