Beyond the Bibi Bill

Israel's Electoral System and the Intifada

by Jeff Halper | published December 19, 2000

December 18 the Knesset partially amended Israel's electoral law—the so-called "Bibi bill"—allowing Binyamin Netanyahu to run against Ehud Barak for prime minister. The law had stipulated that when a government resigns, as Barak's did December 9, elections are held for the prime ministership only, and that only Knesset members may present their candidacy. By the amendment, Netanyahu, who resigned from the Knesset after his 1999 defeat, could have run.

On Hold

International Protection for the Palestinians

by Adam Hanieh | published November 28, 2000

Cracks in Egypt's Electoral Engineering

The 2000 Vote

by Vickie Langohr | published November 7, 2000

The Peres-Arafat Agreement: Can It Work?

by Mouin Rabbani | published November 3, 2000

Within hours of the November 2 announcement that PLO Chairman Yasser Arafat and the Israeli Minister of Regional Cooperation, Shimon Peres, had agreed to implement the understandings reached between Israel and the Palestinian Authority (PA) at the October Sharm al-Sheikh summit, Israeli soldiers shot and killed teenage Palestinian demonstrator Khalid Rezaq in the village of Hizma near Jerusalem. Another Palestinian, Adli Abeid, succumbed to wounds sustained a day earlier at the Mintar/Karni crossing on the eastern border of the Gaza Strip.

Shows of Solidarity Forever

The October 21-22 Arab Summit

by Isam al-Khafaji | published October 20, 2000

Egyptian President Husni Mubarak and his Syrian counterpart Bashar al-Asad will convene an Arab summit in Cairo this weekend to formulate a common stance against the harsh Israeli response to the ongoing Palestinian uprising in the Occupied Territories and within Israel. The summit, the first in over a decade, reflects substantial pressure on Arab regimes from their own populations: large demonstrations in Egypt, Jordan and elsewhere manifest an unusually strong feeling of solidarity with the Palestinian cause on the Arab street.

After the Sharm al-Sheikh Summit

An Armed and Temporary Truce

by Mouin Rabbani | published October 17, 2000

The Iron Fist in the Peace Process

by Roger Normand | published October 4, 2000

Televised images of Israeli combat soldiers killing unarmed Palestinian children and helicopters strafing Palestinian neighborhoods have publicly exposed the Israeli military force that undergirds and shapes the Oslo process.

Running for Cover: The US, World Oil Markets and Iraq

by Chris Toensing | published September 28, 2000

Last week's panic within the Clinton Administration over a potential winter spike in heating oil prices has greatly eased, as oil prices have begun to fall. The Democrats' political planners feared that Republican candidate George W. Bush and voters would blame Clinton and Vice President Al Gore for failing to forestall the price rise that dominated the news for the last two weeks.

Israel's Palestinians and the Politics of Law and Order

by Graham Usher | published September 23, 2000

Last week, a shocking case of Israeli police brutality in the occupied West Bank was reported in the Washington Post. Officers accosted three young Palestinians out delivering groceries, beat them and took photographs of themselves holding up the Palestinians' bloodied heads "like hunting trophies" for the camera. Aggression and erratic behavior on the part of Israeli police is routine in the Occupied Territories -- and familiar to Palestinian citizens of Israel itself.

Iran's Reform Dilemma

Within and Against the State

by Ali Mudara | published September 12, 2000

Politics, Not Policy

Behind US Calls for War Crimes Tribunals for Iraq

by Sarah Graham-Brown | published August 25, 2000

In a public break with the US, British Foreign Secretary Robin Cook today submitted a draft parliamentary bill supporting the rapid establishment of an International Criminal Court (ICC) in which to try major war criminals and violators of human rights. The British move to secure the ICC's ratification in Parliament contrasts sharply with the Clinton administration's recalcitrance on the ICC. The US continues to insist on protecting its own nationals from prosecution by the ICC--even at the cost of watering down the court's mandate.

Egypt Harasses Human Rights Activists

by Nicola Pratt | published August 17, 2000

Family and friends of Saad Eddin Ibrahim, chair of Egypt's Ibn Khaldoun Center for Developmental Studies, breathed a huge sigh of relief on August 10, when Ibrahim was finally released on bail by prosecution authorities. The arrest at gunpoint of this internationally renowned pro-democracy activist and academic in his home on June 30 deeply shocked all of Egypt's civil society activists. Yet, in the context of continued government harassment of non-governmental organizations, Ibrahim's release hardly represents an unqualified victory.